Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Frequently Asked Questions

What are the different types of hyperbaric chambers available?

There are two types of hyperbaric chambers.

The first type is called a multi-place hyperbaric chamber. This chamber, like its name allows for the treatment of multiple patients within the same chamber at the same time.

This chamber is pressurized with air and patients breathe 100% oxygen while wearing a clear plastic hood which allows for unobstructed viewing.

The second type is called a mono-place hyperbaric chamber. This chamber, like its name allows for the treatment of a single patient. The chamber consists of a specialized bed rolls on rails into a clear acrylic chamber. This chamber is pressurized with 100% oxygen and patient simply breathes in the oxygen while lying on the specialized bed.

 

Are there any after effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)?  

                                                   

The majority of patients will experience no after effects from HBOT. However, some people report a popping or cracking sound in their ears between treatments--this sensation should be relieved by applying pressure to clear the ear while inside of an ATM-style chamber (which is used for steamer therapy).

 

How does Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) work?

The majority of patients will experience no after effects from HBOT. However, some people report a popping or cracking sound in their ears between treatments--this sensation should be relieved by applying pressure to clear the ear while inside of an ATM-style chamber (which is used for steamer therapy).

The human body's natural process of breathing in air causes us to consume 21% oxygen and 79%, or sometimes more than 80%, depending on how efficiently you're utilizing your resources at any given time. But what if this system could be improved? What would happen then, with increased levels of supply for tissue healing purposes- does it make sense that these new found benefits might just lead towards better overall health outcomes?! Well yes indeed they do! That was exactly my thinking when developing HBOT therapy which features 100% pure bottled

additional information

 

Is hyperbaric oxygen treatment painful?

 

Hyperbaric oxygen treatments are usually painless, but patients may experience a full sensation in their ears, similar to driving up or down a mountain road, changing altitudes in an airplane, or changing depths in underwater diving. The feeling of fullness occurs as the eardrums respond to the changes in atmospheric pressure.

The eardrum is normally flat, but when it experiences compression during flight or certain activities like swimming underwater without goggles and snorkeling in large waves with open mouth - the ear starts to bow inward. This tends not only cause fullness/pain which can be avoided by force air into our middle ears while descending down a compressed chamber (approx 10 minutes). We are taught specific maneuvers such as swallowing; moving lower jaw forward excess nose pinching-all done so that we may practice these before going on an airplane for instance!

 

What will the patient feel during the treatment?

Once inside the HBOT chamber, patients will hear air beginning to circulate. Patients are able to see and talk with the chamber staff member, who will tell them when the gradual increase in pressure is begun. This is called compression.

When the prescribed pressure of 2.0-2.4 ATA is reached, a hood will cover your head to receive 100% oxygen while inside of it and you'll be able see-through clear plastic! The fullness in ears usually go away during treatment so patients can rest or sleep when necessary, until their session is done which could last up around 2 hours depending on how long they choose watch movies/read books etc...

 

The end of your HBOT treatment will bring about a popping sensation in the ear, much like what one might feel when they are airplane decompression. This is because there has been an automatic decrease in pressure during this stage and it may be uncomfortable at first but after 10 minutes all signs indicate that you're ready for takeoff!

 

How to prepare for treatment?

  • Medications: You will need to provide a complete drug history to avoid any interactions. Each drug a patient is taking will be considered individually in relation to HBOT and if changes in either medication or schedule are necessary, the patient's physician will be advised.

  • Cold and flu symptoms: it is important to notify the hyperbaric staff of a cold or the flu - including fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose, fever blisters, cold sores, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or general body aches. It may be difficult for a patient to clear their ears when these symptoms are present.

  • Smoking: Once HBOT has been prescribed, the patient will be encouraged to stop smoking until the therapy is complete.

  • Cosmetics: any make-up, artificial nails, hair spray, perfume or shaving lotion containing a petroleum or alcohol base is not allowed during the treatment session.

What to Expect during the first visit?

You can set up a consult with a Beaumont specially trained hyperbaric specialist directly or your primary care physician will refer you to be evaluated to determine your candidacy for treatment. If you are considered a qualified candidate for treatment, you will return for subsequent visits to HBOT. You will not have a HBOT treatment during your first visit.

Do I need a referral?

Unless required by your insurance company, you do not need a referral for Oxygen Therapy. However, in order to determine your degree of injury or disease, our physician needs the full medical history of your condition along with a report of your progress and recent medical intervention of your condition from your physician in order to determine your candidacy. This is usually a requirement of your insurance company.

Who is considered a candidate for HBOT?

Because HBOT is used for a specific range of illnesses or diseases, the doctor will evaluate your medical history to determine if you qualify for treatment.

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